The “Sevillanas” (Spanish pronunciation: [seβiˈʝanas]) are a  are a type of folk music and dance of Seville, Spain and its region. They were derived from the old Spanish folk, and in the nineteenth century they were influenced by Flamenco. Generally speaking, a sevillana is very lighthearted, happy music.

Sevillanas

Sevillanas – Flamenco Dance School Maria Osende Photo Credit: Jim Neale

Sevillanas is typically one of the first dances you will will learn when taking flamenco classes. Sevillanas can be heard mainly in fairs and festivals, including the famous Seville FairLa Feria de Sevilla. The Sevillanas Dance consists of four different parts. One can find schools teaching “Sevillanas” in nearly every town in Southern Spain.

Below: About Sevillanas  – Learning videos  – Sevillana steps

Sevillanas are danced by couples of all ages and sexes during celebrations or at nightclubs, often by whole families and towns. Sevillana choreography is very stable and knowing it is very useful, since it is a festival dance. This is why those intending to dance flamenco usually start by learning sevillanas; they are easier to master and there are more occasions for practice and training.

The rhythm of Sevillanas can be interpreted as 3/4, although it is generally 6/8. Each sevillana is composed of 4 numbered sections ( 1, 2 3 and 4),  with each part divided into 3 sections (tercios) and with each segment made up of 6 movements. During festivals and shows, it is often the Sevillana dancing visitors to Andalusia mistakenly take as Flamenco, as it is a vivid style, full of turns.

Sevillanas are danced by couples of all ages and sexes during celebrations or at nightclubs, often by whole families and towns. Sevillana choreography is very stable and knowing it is very useful, since it is a festival dance. This is why those intending to dance flamenco usually start by learning sevillanas; they are easier to master and there are more occasions for practice and training.

Common Sevillanas Steps

Paso de  Sevillana: The most common dance step performed in Sevillanas includes a front and backward stepping pattern
Pasada/Pasadas: Partners switch places with each other twice in each verse.
Pas de Basque A waltzing, 3-count step
Careos: Passing waltzing steps in which dancers switch positions facing each other, the word “cara” means “face”,  “careos” meaning face t0 face.
Vuelta/s:  pivot turns.

Each “copla” (or each sevillana as in # 1, #2…etc) is approximately 1 minute to 90 seconds long depending on the tempo, making the entire dance 4-6 minutes long.

Sevillana #1 Sevillana #2 Sevillana #3Sevillana #4
Section 1

Five Pasos de Sevillana

1 Pasada

Section 2

1 Paso de Sevillana

4 Esquinas (grapevines):

1 Pasada

Section 3

1 Paso de Sevillana

4 Pasadas. First one start L

1 Vuelta (turn)
Section 1

One Paso de Sevillana

3 Pasos Arrastraos (Brush Steps)

1 Vuelta (Turn)

1 Paso pasada

Section 2

1 Paso de Sevillana

6 Pas de Basques (Pasos Cruzados)

1 Vuelta (Turn)

1 Pasada

Section 3

1 Paso de Sevillana

6 walking steps
(Wedding March around each other)


1 Vuelta (Turn)
Section 1

One Paso de Sevillana

1 turn left, show off right foot

1 turn right,
show off left foot

1 Pasada

Section 2

1 Paso de Sevillana

3 x grapevine and footwork

1 Pasada

Section 3

1 Paso de Sevillana

1 Pasada and hold off tapping right foot

1 Pasada and hold off tapping left foot


1 Vuelta (Turn)
Section 1

One Paso de Sevillana

grapevine and 1 turn to the left

grapevine and 1 turn to the right

1 Pasada


Section 2

One Paso de Sevillana

1 Careo = 2 crossing walzes

2 Pas de Basques

2 Careos

1 turn left

1 Pasada


Section3

1 Paso de Sevillana

4 Careos

1 Vuelta (turn)